$80,000 Non-Pecuniary Assessment for 80% Recovered but Lingering Myofascial Pain Syndrome

Reasons for judgement were published today by the BC Supreme Court, Vancouver Registry, assessing damages for myofascial pain developed secondary to a vehicle collision.

In today’s case (Tang v. Duong) the Plaintiff was injured in a 2015 collision where the Defendant turned into the plaintiff’s lane of travel at an intersection.   The Plaintiff developed various soft tissue injuries which resulted in regional myofascial pain syndrome.  By the time of trial the injuries were about 80% improved but the lingering symptoms were expected to persist.  In assessing non-pecuniary damages at $80,000 Mr. Justice Thompson provided the following reasons:

[11]         It is convenient to begin with Dr. Letcher’s evidence, which I accept in its entirety. On physical examination in September 2019, over four years after the MVA, Dr. Letcher identified tenderness and palpable trigger points on the right side of Mr. Tang’s neck, and the right side of his low back. Dr. Letcher reviewed the medical documentation made available to him, and noted the documentation of significant and prolonged low mood, anxiety disorder, sleep disturbance, as well as decreased exercise/activity tolerance. This was consistent with the history provided to him by Mr. Tang, and consistent with Mr. Tang’s evidence at trial, which I accept.

[12]         Dr. Letcher’s opinion is that the MVA probably caused acute muscle and ligamentous strains to Mr. Tang’s neck and back, which would have healed within about eight weeks, but he has subsequently developed regional myofascial pain syndrome affecting his neck and low back. At the time that Dr. Letcher examined Mr. Tang, there was no clear evidence of a more diffuse chronic pain syndrome such as fibromyalgia. I accept this evidence, and despite Dr. Lee’s diagnosis of fibromyalgia, I am not satisfied on the balance of probabilities that Mr. Tang ever met the diagnostic criteria for that condition.

[13]         Dr. Letcher’s opinion is that Mr. Tang’s depressed mood, anxiety, and sleep disturbance complicate his prognosis, which Dr. Letcher describes as “guarded given the chronicity of his symptoms.” His neck and back pain will most likely persist into the foreseeable future, with some improvement with treatment strategies. Although Mr. Tang is not disabled from work, Dr. Letcher emphasized that he would need to “work around his symptoms as best as possible….

[17]         Mr. Tang has endured a significant amount of pain, and although I find he has achieved a recovery on the order of 80 percent, the likelihood is that he will always have some pain and stiffness in his neck and low back. Work is important to Mr. Tang, and the effects of his injuries causes him to have to work around his symptoms. He has been able to keep up with domestic chores since the summer of 2015. His injuries have affected his recreational pursuits, but in a modest way.  ..

[20]         Each of these cases has been of some help in making the assessment, but, naturally, each has important distinguishing features. Making an individualized assessment, I consider that $80,000 is a fit award for non-pecuniary damages.

bc injury law, chronic myofascial pain syndrome, chronic regional myofascial pain syndrome, Mr. Justice Thompson, Tang v. Duong

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ERIK
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When not writing the BC Injury Law Blog, Erik is the managing partner at MacIsaac & Company, based in Victoria, B.C. He is also involved with combative sports regulatory issues and authors the Combat Sports Law Blog.

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