BC Injury Law and ICBC Claims Blog

$90,000 Non-Pecuniary Damages for PTSD and Chronic Pain

Reasons for judgment were released today by the BC Supreme Court, Vernon Registry, awarding a Plaintiff just over $142,000 in total damages as a result of a 2005 BC Car Crash.

In today’s case (Quinlan v. Quaiscer) the Plaintiff suffered various injuries including PTSD and a Chronic Pain Disorder.  In valuing the Plaintiff’s non-pecuniary damages (money for pain and suffering and loss of enjoyment of life) at $90,000 Mr. Justice Cole summarized the Plaintiff’s injuries and their effect on her life as follows:

[61] There is evidence that the plaintiff has suffered from depression off and on since 1994, including post-partum depression after the births of her children. Additionally, the plaintiff has had a tumultuous relationship with her now ex-husband, which has certainly affected her emotional state. There is evidence, however, that the plaintiff’s prescription for depression medication a few months prior to the Accident was not filled. Dr. Pirolli stated in her report that the plaintiff’s current emotional problems include PTSD and low mood. The PTSD, as I have stated above, is a consequence of the Accident. Regarding the plaintiff’s low mood, Dr. Pirolli stated that it could not “be directly attributed to the accident itself. There is the possibility, however, that any psychological issues present at the time of the accident may have been exacerbated by the accident and its sequelae”. In my view, the plaintiff’s depression prior to the Accident was not significant, and I find that the plaintiff was not suffering from debilitating depression at the time of the Accident.

[62] As mentioned above, the plaintiff’s cuts and bruises resolved within three to six months after the Accident. She is left with a permanent one-inch scar on her elbow, a three and a half inch c-shaped scar on her left knee, and a dark scar on her left shin. Her nose was broken and she had dizziness and headaches. As described in the medical evidence above, the plaintiff’s right wrist pain, right shoulder and right chest area injuries have persisted. Though Dr. Travlos was of the view that the plaintiff would continue to improve over the next 18 months (from his report of April 2007), he stated: “To what extent she recovers is difficult to say at this time and a definitive prognosis cannot be made”. The plaintiff’s problems have not improved to any great extent over the course of the 18 months following that report.

[63] Dr. Travlos was of the view that the plaintiff’s problems of chronic pain syndrome related to the diffused soft-tissue pain that the plaintiff suffered in the right arm and shoulder. In cross-examination he stated that it was unlikely that the plaintiff will fully recover and there is no guarantee that participation in treatment recommendations will result in improvements of those symptoms. The plaintiff’s injuries restrict her ability to participate in physical activities that she formerly enjoyed, such as skiing and baseball. I believe, however, that part of the reason the plaintiff does not participate in these sports is because of a lack of financial resources.

[64] I am satisfied that taking into consideration the plaintiff’s PTSD and her multiple injuries, an appropriate award for non-pecuniary general damages would be $90,000.

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