BC Injury Law and ICBC Claims Blog

$25,000 Non-Pecuniary Assessment for STI's With Full Recovery Within Two Years

Adding to this site’s archived caselaw for soft tissue injury compensation, reasons for judgement were released last week by the BC Supreme Court, New Westminster Registry, assessing damages for soft tissue injuries which “achieved full¬†physical¬†recovery no later than two years after the accident“.

In last week’s case (Nemoto v. Phagura) the Plaintiff, who recently moved to Canada from Japan, was injured in a 2008 collision. ¬† She was 13 at the time. ¬†Fault was admitted by the offending motorist. ¬†She suffered soft tissue injuries to her neck and lower back. ¬† She also experienced anxiety while riding in a vehicle subsequent to the collision. ¬†In assessing non-pecuniary damages at $25,000 Mr. Justice Smith provided the following reasons:

[16]         On the evidence before me, I find that the plaintiff suffered significant pain and limitations from the date of the accident until approximately the end of 2008, with intermittent, lingering difficulties for at least another year, but had achieved full physical recovery no later than two years after the accident. The physical difficulties in the immediate post-accident period were likely more difficult for the plaintiff to deal with than might otherwise have been the case because she was, at the same time, adjusting to a new school and life in a new country.

[17]         I also find that the plaintiff experienced severe anxiety while riding in cars for approximately two years and that anxiety still affects her efforts to learn to drive. For purposes of assessing damages, it does not matter that this anxiety may, to some extent, be influenced by the fact that her mother has similar fears and anxiety flowing from the same accident. In any event, there is no reason to believe this will be a long-term problem.

[18]¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†The plaintiff is in Canada on a student visa, which does not permit her to work, so there is no claim for income loss. I find there is no need for any future care arising from the accident…

[22]¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†In all the circumstances, I assess the infant plaintiff Rui Nemoto‚Äôs non-pecuniary damages at $25,000…

If you found this article useful please share with others:
  • TwitThis
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati

Tags: , , , ,

Leave a Reply

 

This site is created by MacIsaac & Company, a British Columbia Personal Injury Lawfirm. This website is not affiliated in any way with the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC).This web site is made possible through funding provided by the British Columbia law firm MacIsaac and Company. bc-injury-law.com is designed to empower individuals to better understand their ICBC Claim and the process involved in dealing with ICBC. This web site is offered for information only and is not claim-specific legal advice. Use of the site and sending or receiving information through it does not establish a solicitor / client relationship. Links to and from this website do not state or imply a relationship between MacIsaac and Company and the linked entity.

Copyright © 2008 The MacIsaac Group of Law Firms. All rights reserved.
Web Site Design by Sage Internet Solutions Ltd.